Lessons Learned from Self-Publishing


I still have the last remaining copy of my first book; a historic cookbook titled Anna’s Kitchen. I produced and self-published it back in 2005. I learned a lot from the experience, and I’ve done my best to share what I’ve learned with other authors.

Looking back, I must admit I was such a little smart-aleck at the time that I thought I knew everything. Okay, so maybe my having been a freelance graphic designer helped. I was able to produce something that looked really cool. That counts for something, right? However, back then I didn’t know squat about editing, distribution, or marketing. So, here are but some of the lessons I learned.

  • A spell checker is not a substitute for an editor, or a proofreader.
  • If you want your book to be distributed, you really need Ingram.
  • 500 books really does take up a lot of room in your shed.

Ah, I was so naive at the time, but it was a good, yet humbling, learning experience. The following year I wrote Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, the first of my Luke and Jenny series of historical novels for young readers. That same year I signed on with a partnership publisher, Five Star Publications, Inc. (Now Story Monsters, LLC.) Linda Radke, the company president, was an amazing mentor. I learned a lot about the publishing business from her.

After I finished Riding with the James Gang, the final book in the Luke and Jenny trilogy, I was ready for a change. I wanted to write full-fledged novels for adult readers. In 2011, I wrote my first romance novel, The Reunion, under the pen name, Marina Martindale. Linda Radke was also changing her business model to publishing children’s books only. However, we both agreed I was ready to go out on my own, and I started up my own publishing company, Good Oak Press, LLC.

Writing novels isn’t a hobby. It’s a business. My advice to any novel writer, or prospective novel writer, is to treat it like a business. Kudos to you if you’re lucky enough to beat the odds and sign on with a traditional publisher. However, as I explained in my earlier post, The Three Options for Publishing Your Book, the odds of a major publishing house signing on a first-time author are extremely slim at best. Most of us will either sign on with a partnership publisher, or we’ll start up our own publishing business.

If you’re a new author, or if you only plan on writing one book, I recommend finding a good partnership publisher, but writer beware. There are some bad actors out there too, so I highly suggest you do some research before signing on with them.

If you’re planning on writing more than one book you may want to consider doing what I did and creating your own publishing company, which you can do as a sole proprietor, or as an LLC. Each has their pros and cons, so again, you will have to do some research, as rules and regulations for creating a corporation vary by state.

I’ve learned a lot about book publishing since I wrote my first book. Some through trial and error, but mostly through working with Linda. Looking back, I have no regrets, and I plan on writing and publishing books many more books.

Gayle Martin