Creating the Perfect Storm

© Can Stock Photo/ rozum

One of the most essential, if not the most essential, elements of writing fiction is creating intense climax scenes. They’re the “OMG!” moments readers expect, and, just like any other part of fiction writing, creating a page turning, believable climax takes some skill.

Set the stage properly

Introduce the conflict early in your story, and start it out small. I write contemporary romance, so my conflicts begin as seemingly everyday occurrences. Someone meets a stranger who seems familiar, but they can’t place them. Someone has fallen on hard times and has to do a job they don’t feel comfortable doing so they can pay their bills. Someone accidentally stumbles across something that looks incriminating about a person they thought they knew. From there you add more tension and conflict and build your story.

How to Create the Perfect Storm

As you build up the tension there will come a point when it needs to be released. For me, this is where the fun begins. The following is my formula, and I find it works well.

  • I begin by putting my protagonist(s) in the wrong place at the wrong time, but I don’t make it obvious. My locations have included a courthouse in the middle of a busy workday. A resort hotel on a busy night. A character’s backyard on a beautiful fall day. Wherever it is, I make it the last place where my protagonist would expect anything major to go wrong.
  • I try to involve as many cast members as I can. The more people on the scene when it hits the fan, the more potential for things to happen. Most importantly, I make sure everything that could possibly go wrong goes wrong.
  • Miscommunication adds to the drama. In my novels phone batteries go dead, urgent messages aren’t delivered, and misunderstandings abound. Someone will inevitably get the wrong information and draw the wrong conclusion.
  • I break up the action as much as I can. If more than one character is involved, I’ll end one scene with a cliffhanger, such as a character waiting for help to arrive, and then I’ll jump over to another character to see what he or she is up to. Also, depending on the story, I may even jump to a character who doesn’t know anything is wrong. At least, not yet, and they’re not knowing something has happened adds to the overall tension. Breaking up the action while everything is falling to pieces creates more suspense and keeps the reader engaged.
  • Timing is everything. I don’t want my climax to end too quickly, nor do I want it to drag on for too long. Each story I write is different, so I have to rely on my own intuition. Typically, my big climax scenes go for two to three chapters, sometimes less. It all depends on how complex the scene is, and how many characters are involved.

So there you have it. The more things go wrong, the more suspenseful, and dramatic, your climax will be, and the more it will engage your reader.

Gayle Martin

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