I No Longer Follow Dale L Roberts

© Can Stock Photo / tangducminh

There are good people out there giving good advice for writers and those who want to become writers. Some, like yours truly, have traditional blogs. Others, such as Dale L Roberts, use YouTube. I stumbled on his channel when he posted a video comparing the print quality of several well known POD (print on demand) book printers. While I was there I clicked on the subscribe button as he had some good information. However, I have unsubscribed from his channel, and I did so for a very good reason.

Those of you who follow this blog know that I am very much opposed to using AI software of any kind for writing books. In fact, I recently wrote a blog article called, AI Will NOT be Writing my Novels. Another reason why I am opposed to AI is because AI cheapens our profession.

Once was a time, if you wanted to be a writer, you had to have talent. You also had to learn your craft. In other words, you had to pay your dues. Now, thanks to AI, any would-be-if-they-could-be can buy AI software, and with a few clicks of a mouse, have an instant book that they actually didn’t write. A machine wrote it for them. They’re just putting their name on it and saying they wrote it. No, this isn’t the same as using a ghostwriter. A ghostwriter is a real human being who also paid his or her dues.

So this morning I’m on YouTube, and here’s Dale L Roberts touting the latest new AI software for writers which allegedly mixes human creativity with AI technology. Gee, Dale, I’ve only been writing books without AI for about twenty years now. How did I possibly manage to do it on my own, using real human editors and proofreaders, and not use AI?

So, once again, I point out in the comments that real writers have talent, and if you want to be a writer you should take some writing classes. So, he attacks my comment. It’s his platform. He is free to attack me if he wishes. However, I don’t have to take his crap! So, I deleted my comment, and unsubscribed from his channel. I am also speaking my mind on my platform, not his, and if Dale L Roberts doesn’t like what I have to say then too freaking bad.

AI does not make you a better writer. AI just makes you a lazy writer. Or a fake writer. Let me say it again, just for you, Dale. AI cheapens our profession. If you’re serious writer, you do not need to use AI. You already have the talent, and the skills, to write your own original content in your own, unique writing voice.  You’re also the kind of writer who doesn’t believe in using software which can plagiarize other writers’ work.

If you want to follow Dale L Roberts on YouTube you are certainly free do to so. However, because I am very much opposed AI writing software for the reasons I have mentioned above, I can no longer recommend him as a good information source. If you want to be a writer, take some writing classes. Join professional associations. Network with other authors and learn from your peers. As for me, I’m standing by my principles. I worked damn hard to learn my craft. Therefore, I will continue to write my own unique content without using AI software of any kind, and without Mr. Dale L Roberts’ approval.

Gayle Martin

From the Writer’s Desk is written, edited, and maintained by a real human being. It does not include content generated by AI (Artificial Intelligence) software of any kind.

No part of this blog may be used or reproduced or transmitted in any form, or used in any matter by AI, without the express written consent Good Oak Press, LLC. Requests for permission must be addressed to Good Oak Press, LLC, P.O. Box 51244, Denton, TX 76206-1244

Find Your Own Writing Voice

Photo by Gayle Martin

One thing we writers have in common, regardless of our genres, is our own unique writing voice. What’s a writing voice? Simply put, a writing voice is the way you organize your thoughts and put them into words. No two of us do this exactly the same way. For example, some writers are more descriptive. Others are more direct. Danielle Steele and Rosamunde Pilcher are two of my favorite authors. Both are amazing story tellers, but their writing voices are very distinct. I would never confuse a Danielle Steele novel with a Rosamunde Pilcher novel.

The other day one of my Facebook friends posted about having a hard time writing his novel. As writers, we all have our moments. However, he was trying to write like another author. I responded with, “You need to write like you, not like someone else.” He response was to let me know he’d changed the narrative from third person to first person, and he was a lot more comfortable writing in the first person. I’m not a big fan of first person narratives myself, but some readers like them, and if it works for him then thats’s what matters. There is no right or wrong narrative.

So, how do you find your writing voice? The best way I know would be to start writing. Grab a notebook and a pen, and start keeping a journal. Writing classes can also be a big help. Every community college offers writing courses of some kind, and they’re usually very affordable. I also recommend taking the classes in person if at all possible. Having a real live instructor makes a huge difference. Other students can be helpful as well. If you’re unable to take a class in person there are online Master Classes for writing. As you learn more techniques, and become more comfortable with writing, you’ll discover your writing voice.

While other writers can certainly influence us, we should never set out to emulate them. There was only one Mark Twain, one Jane Austen, and one Edgar Allen Poe. No one could ever replace them. Likewise, there is only one you, so write like you.

Gayle Martin

 

From the Writer’s Desk is written, edited, and maintained by a real human being. It does not include content generated by AI (Artificial Intelligence) software of any kind.

No part of this blog may be used or reproduced or transmitted in any form, or used in any matter without the express written consent Good Oak Press, LLC. Requests for permission must be addressed to Good Oak Press, LLC, P.O. Box 51244, Denton, TX 76206-1244

 

 

Why You May Need Different ISBNs

Cover illustration by Wesley Lowe. Cover design by Good Oak Press, LLC

Some first-time authors find ISBN numbers confusing. It’s actually quite simple. An ISBN is an identification number for a book.

Why you need an ISBN number

If you plan on selling your book, (and who isn’t?) the book seller will need the ISBN number. It’s also included in the barcodes. Every item we buy has a barcode number. I’m even seeing little barcode stickers on fresh produce. The days of cashiers punching prices into a cash register by hand are long gone.  An ISBN number is also required if you plan on selling your books online.

How to get an ISBN number

I purchase my ISBN numbers in bulk from Bowker. They sell them individually, or in lots of ten to one thousand. I prefer to buy mine in lots of ten. It comes to just under thirty dollars per number. The bigger the lot, the less per number. If you were to buy one thousand, each would cost a dollar and fifty cents. However, as prolific of an author as I am, I don’t think I could write a thousand books in my lifetime. Therefore, I will stick with buying lots of ten.

Please note the ISBN number is registered to the publisher. I registered a trade name with the State of Arizona when I started writing books. (As I was living in Arizona at the time.) Again, I highly recommend this, as it will make you look more professional. However, if you don’t want to take this step, you may want to consider partnership publishing. The partnership publisher will assign you one of their ISBN numbers.

Bowker has included other services since I first started working with them. They now offer copyright registration, cover design, as well as many others. I highly recommend them.

Some book selling platforms also offer ISBN numbers. This includes Amazon and Draft2Digital. When I left Ingram, I needed new ISBN numbers for my print books. Even through I purchased then from Bowker, Ingram was the original distributor. For whatever reason, it created an issue with Draft2Digital, but they offered me free ISBN numbers for their print editions. The Amazon editions still use the original ISBN numbers I purchased from Bowker.

When you need more than one ISBN number

Most authors will publish an eBook and print edition of their book. Some may also offer an audiobook. However, each edition requires its own ISBN number. Print editions may also require additional numbers, as a hardcover book differs from a paperback. While each version may have the same publisher, each edition is a different product. Therefore it is unique. The same rule applies if you were to offer a second edition of an older title. Because the content is different from the original, it will need a differet ISNB number.

Buyer Beware

There are, unfortunately, a lot of bad actors out there taking advantage of newbie authors. One common scam is to offer free or highly discounted ISBN numbers. The numbers are either fake, or they may have been assigned to a book which is no longer in print. Only buy an ISBN number from a trusted source, such as Bowker. As mentioned before, some distributors, such as Amazon or Draft2Digital may offer free ISBN numbers. However, there may be limitations to the distribution channels.

Make sure your happy with your title before you assign an ISBN

Once you assign an ISBN number to a book title, the title cannot be changed. I typically assign my print edition ISBN number to my manuscript while I am writing. However, I have not yet done so with the current book I’m working on. When writing fiction, you’ll find that characters can have minds of their own. This means they will sometimes take a story in a different direction than originally planned, as is the case here.  So, for now, I’m considering the title, Rivalry, as a working title only. Once the manuscript is complete, I’ll ask my editor if she thinks the title fits the story. If so, great. If not, then I haven’t blown $29.50 on an ISBN number which I may never be able to use.

Gayle Martin

 

From the Writter’s Desk is written, edited, and maintained by a real human being. It does not include content generated by AI (Artificial Intelligence) software of any kind.

No part of this blog may be used or reproduced or transmitted in any form, or used in any matter by AI, without the express written consent Good Oak Press, LLC. Requests for permission must be addressed to Good Oak Press, LLC, P.O. Box 51244, Denton, TX 76206-1244

 

We’ll Just Split the Royalties

Photo by Pond5

One of the Facebook publishing groups I belong to seems to attract a large number of first-time authors as well as prospective authors. We all have to start somewhere, and I try to help out whenever I can.

The posts typically come from people who are even more clueless than I was when I was getting started, and trust me, I was pretty darn clueless. (I’d written a historic cookbook called, Anna’s Kitchen,  and I thought I knew it all. Let’s just say I’ve come a long way since then.) That said, I’m sometimes flabbergasted at some of the things people are posting, such as the prospective author who couldn’t afford to pay her illustrator, so she wanted to know if it would be okay to split the book royalties 50/50 instead?

Umm…no!

There are many myths out there about writing and publishing books. One of the biggest, and most persistent, is that authors make big bucks from their book sales. There are some who do, but they’re the exception. In reality, most authors have to have day jobs if they want to pay their bills. Their book royalties are, at best, income supplements.

There are also out-of-pocket expenses involved when it comes to writing and publishing books, such as editing, proofreading, and cover design. Laptops and tablets cost money. Pens and paper cast money too. I understand that money may be an issue for some, and if it’s an issue for you then you may be tempted to do it all yourself. My advice, however, is don’t. Very few people have the skillset to do it all, which means you will have to hire people to do certain tasks.

As noted, it’s easy for someone who has never written a book before to assume their book will make a profit. They may think it’s perfectly okay to offer to share a portion of their future profits, or royalties, in lieu of paying for the work. It isn’t. The people proofreading your manuscript and designing your book cover have bills to pay. Asking them to work on spec is, at best, unprofessional.

What about asking your spouse, or your best friend, or your great-aunt Mary? Again, I don’t recommend it. Family and friends usually aren’t qualified to do the task, but if you need an editor, and your great-aunt Mary just happens to be a retired English teacher, then maybe you could ask her. Keep in mind, however, that she may say no, or she may expect favors from you in return.

The fact of of matter is that you have to pay your people for services rendered. If you can’t afford to pay them, then I’m sorry to say you can’t afford publish your book. At least for now.

Gayle Martin

 

From the Writer’s Desk is written, edited, and maintained by a real human being. It does not include content generated by AI (Artificial Intelligence) software of any kind.

No part of this blog may be used or reproduced or transmitted in any form, or used in any matter by AI, without the express written consent Good Oak Press, LLC. Requests for permission must be addressed to Good Oak Press, LLC, P.O. Box 51244, Denton, TX 76206-1244

 

 

 

AI Will NOT be Writing My Novels

© Can Stock Photo / vwalakte

I’m hearing a lot of hoopla about AI being here. I’m also reading some interesting social media posts about it from fellow authors. Let’s just say we’re not impressed. None of us plan on using it.

I’m also perfectly capable of writing my own blog posts, thank you very much. I’ve been writing them for years, and I certainly don’t need a robot to write them for me. And, like all writers I have own unique writing voice.  So why would I allow a piece of software to take my voice away from me?

For novel writers, writing is very much a form of art. We tap into our wonderful human imaginations and create stories. We create imaginary people and bring them to life. Over the years readers have told me how believable my characters are. I take it as a complement. Interestingly enough, I don’t consciously create them. I’ll start out with a few basic ideas, such as their age and physical characteristics. The magic happens when I put them on paper. They come to life, and they tell me who they are. I also put a lot of love into my stories. No machine can do that. Machines aren’t living beings. Therefore, they cannot experience emotions.

Lord willing, I plan on writing romance novels for many years to come. Writing novels is my life’s calling. It’s what gives my life its meaning and purpose. I will also continue using human editors and proofreaders. Of course this means my books might contain a few errors. No human being is perfect. Making mistakes is one of the things that makes us human.

I’m currently working on my next Marina Martindale contemporary romance novel, and I will be adding the following to my disclaimer.

This book was written and edited by real human beings. We do not include content generated by AI (Artificial Intelligence) software of any kind.

I’ve worked hard to create a following. I want my readers to feel confident in knowing that the novels they are reading were written by me, and not by a machine.

Gayle Martin aka Marina Martindale

 

No, I am Not a Hobbyist

Whenever I log into Facebook I always look at my memories page. It’s interesting to see something I posted years ago. Sometimes it’s bittersweet. I’ll read a comment, or see a like, from a good friend or family member who has since passed away.

The other day I found something notable on my memories page. It was something I posted back in 2018 about how artists sometimes have to deal with people who disrespect them and refuse to pay them a fair price for their services. One man commented that perhaps the problem was supply and demand. He thought there were simply too many artists out there. Therefore, we should give up our art.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean the person who is giving their opinion is right.

My arts are writing and photography. They are my life’s passions. My art is what defines me as a human being. It’s what gives my life its meaning and purpose. Other artists, whether they be writers, musicians, actors, or painters, will tell you the same.

The Myth that Artists are Merely Hobbyists

It’s age-old misconception that way too many people seem to embrace. Art is nothing more than a hobby. People who are serious about earning a living need to get a “real job.” Whatever a real job is.

Some artists are lucky. They’re able to make a living full time with their art. Or they may find a career where they can use their artistic skills, such as a copywriter or graphic designer at an advertising agency. Most, however, will have to find a day job, and they are not alone. There are teachers, office workers, and others who have to work second jobs in order to make ends meet. So why are they not called, “hobbyists?”

They Would Be if They Could Be

There are some who get into the arts, not to express themselves, but because they want to become rich and famous. I recall once talking to a man who told me he was going to write a book, but he refused to tell me what his book was about. All he would say was he had come up with an idea that was so unique no one in human history had ever thought of it before. Therefore, his book was going to be a runaway bestseller. Hollywood would want to buy the screen rights to his story. This was why he couldn’t tell me what his book was about. If he told me, I would steal it from him.

Sometimes it’s hard to keep a straight face. I asked him how far along was he in writing his book. He said he hadn’t started writing it yet. Of course he hadn’t. No surprise there. So I wished him the best of luck. He will need it.

The man was a total fake. Real artists aren’t trying to impress anyone. They’re much too busy creating their art. The others, the ones who would-be if they could-be, are just blowing hot air about what they’re going to do. Someday. When they have the time. Right now they’re just too busy. I’ll give the man credit. He became the inspiration for a feature article called, The Author Myth, which is posted above the blog banner.

Some people do enjoy dabbling in art simply because they enjoy it. To them it’s strictly a hobby. They’re not interested in becoming professionals, and that’s okay too. However, they should never be confused with other artists who are professionals and are paid for their work, even if they have other jobs.

So What Defines an Artist?

An artist is someone who creates art because it’s their life’s calling. They will do whatever they have to do, including working day jobs, to pay the bills so they can continue being artists.

I consider myself an artist. As I mentioned before, my art happens to be fine art photography and writing contemporary romance novels. I’m an author with a good following. I also created my own publishing company, Good Oak Press, LLC. Many of my fellow independent authors have done the same.

We’re in this gig because writing is our life’s passion. We’ve put many, many years of blood, sweat and tears into learning our craft and becoming the people we are. As far as we’re concerned, anyone who thinks we should, “give up our art and get a real job,” is woefully ignorant.

 

The Cure for Writer’s Block

Image by Gayle Martin

It happens to all of us at one time or another. We run into a proverbial brick wall and suddenly find ourselves unable to come up with something to write about. Oh, no! It’s the dreaded writer’s block. Ugh!

Creativity is a funny thing. We can’t  turn it on and off whenever it’s convenient. This can be particularly frustrating for fiction writers who have to juggle their writing between work and family time, only to end up staring at a blank screen or paper and wondering what to do with it.

Sometimes switching gears and writing about another topic can help. I have friends who typically work on two or three different books at the same time. If they get stuck on one they simply set it aside and work on another one. However, if you’re like me, and you only work on one story at a time, then you may have to get a little more creative. Try stepping away from the computer and doing a project that’s been on your to do list for too long. Those nagging issues really can effect your creativity.

If that doesn’t help, then why not take a break and do something you enjoy doing? Bake some cookies. Play a round of golf. Go to a movie, or a ball game. Take a day trip somewhere. Read a book that you haven’t had time to read. Call a friend or relative you haven’t spoken to in awhile. Taking a time out and doing something different, particularly if it’s something you really enjoy, but don’t get to do too often, gives your mind a chance to focus on other things, giving your creative muse a rest.

Don’t worry about your story. It’ll come back. And when it does, you can pick up where you left off.

Gayle Martin

Blogs or Newsletters?

© Can Stock Photo/ kurhan

I saw a Twitter post the other day from another author asking which was best. A blog or a newsletter? I responded by saying I use both. I also have  websites. The Internet is an interesting place. You never know how or where someone will find you. Therefore, I’m of the opinion that you can never have too much online presence.

The Difference Between a Blog and a Traditional Website

Years ago I attended a meeting with the now defunct Arizona Book Publishers Association. The speaker, whose name I unfortunately can no longer recall, was an expert on online book marketing. He talked about how you need both a website an a blog. He described a website as the place where “you wore your business suit.” It should be straightforward and formal. As an author, I use my website to showcase my books.

The speaker then described a blog as less formal and more personal than a website. It was where you wore your sweats. In other words, a blog was where you could talk one to one with your readers. I use my Marina Martindale blog to share excerpts from my books, talk about my inspiration, and discuss my characters in depth.

Using a Blog as a Website

Nowadays many websites include a blog feed. At one time I included them on my website as well. Then one day it mysteriously vanished. I called tech support. They had no idea what was going on, but they couldn’t restore the feed either. I’ll just say I’m glad my blogs and websites use different hosts.

Some people use their blog as their website. There’s certainly nothing wrong with that. In fact, I recommend Blogger to those authors with limited budgets who can’t afford website hosting. Blogger is free and easy to use. You can customize your template to give it a unique look. The only out of pocket expense would be buying your own domain name. It’s optional, but I highly recommend it.

I use a WordPress blog for my historic cookbook website. Cookbooks are unique as they’re not actually read. They’re used for finding recipes. Therefore, my blog/website is for posting recipes and cooking tips, with a link to buy the cookbook at the end of each post.

One final word about author websites. Some authors like to include a bookstore. I once had one on my website as well. However, I soon discovered that readers don’t feel comfortable buying directly from the author or publisher. They prefer to buy from reputable online booksellers, such as Amazon. I’ve since taken my bookstore down and replaced it with links to where they can buy the books.

Newsletters

My newsletter is where I pitch my books. Each newsletter includes at least one “free sample” article with a link to a book except on my blog. I also have a monthly contest where my subscribers can win a free, author signed paperback edition of one of my novels. All they have do to enter is answer a multiple choice question correctly. The question is always something from the book I’m giving away, and I include a “hint.” The hint is a link to another blog post with with an except revealing the correct answer. It’s a great way to get people to read a sample. It’s an even better way to get a book into a reader’s hands. Back when I used to distribute through Ingram I always opted to have them ship returns to me. I’d much rather use them as contest prizes than have them end up in a landfill. It’s a win win for everyone.

A few words of caution regarding newsletters. People have to opt in. Never sign anyone up without their permission. You also need to limit how often you send them. I limit mine to one newsletter a month. The only exception is when I’m launching a new book. I will send them a short, to the point announcement with a link to where they can buy the book. I save the rest for the next newsletter. The number one reason why people unsubscribe to a newsletter is because they’re receiving too many of them. So when it comes to newsletters, less is more.

 

 

 

 

Another Self Publishing Advantage

Throughout this blog I’ve discussed many of the advantages of indie publishing over traditional publishing. Now here’s another item to add to the list. Owning the rights to your work.

First things first however. Before going any further, I need to state that I’m not an attorney. Nor is anything in this blog ever to be considered legal advice. This discussion concerns works of fiction, written of the author’s own volition. In this context it is common knowledge that the author owns the rights to whatever fictional stories he or she wishes to create.

The Problem with Traditional Publishing

The business model for traditional publishing is for the publisher to pay the author an advance against their royalties. In exchange, the author signs some or all of their rights to their work to the publisher. It all sounds wonderful. At least on paper. But when talking with traditionally published authors, I often hear the same story. “My name is on the book, but it’s not what I wrote.” Unfortunately, this is what happens when the author signs away their rights to the publisher. The publisher can revise or rewrite the story in ways that the author never imagined or intended.

Some authors may not care. As long as they’re getting their royalty checks, they’re okay with it. However, those of us who pour our hearts and souls into our work may find it problematic.

The Advantage of Nontraditional Publishing

Like many fiction authors, I put a lot of thought into what I write. For example, I may name my lead character Erica after a favorite aunt. She has  long blonde hair and brown eyes like my best friend in fifth grade. The story is set in Idaho because my family vacationed there when I was a kid. In other words, everything I write is there for a reason. I also have my own unique writing  voice. It’s like a signature and it distinguishes me from other authors. So the last thing I want is a nameless, faceless editor to come along and change Erica’s name to Sarah, and morph her into a brunette living in Boston. Nor do I want anyone taking away my voice. This is why I do nontraditional publishing.

Partnership Publishing and Self Publishing

There are two avenues for nontraditional publishing. Self publishing and partnership publishing.

Like a traditional publisher, a partnership publisher prints and distributes the book. Many, if not most, offer additional services, such as editing, proofreading, typesetting, and cover design, just like a traditional publisher. But unlike a traditional publisher, they do not buy the rights to the author’s work. All rights remain with the author. This means they do not make any changes to the content or story without the author’s okay.

There are a number of good partnership publishers out there. Unfortunately, there are others that are not. Therefore, it is up to you, the author, to do your research and find the right company. Fortunately there are resources, such as Writer Beware and Trust Pilot, which can help you weed out the bad guys

The other option is self publishing. In this model the author is in charge every aspect of writing, producing, and distributing the book. I tried self-publishing when I first started writing. We’ll just say it was a humbling experience. I then worked with a partnership publisher. Later on, when I understood how the business worked, I created my own publishing company, Good Oak Press, LLC. Having been a graphic designer before I became a writer, it was the right choice for me, but it’s not right for everyone. If it’s not for you, don’t worry. Partnership publishing gives you plenty of options without signing away the rights to your work.

When to Consult with an Attorney

Those with specific questions about copyrights should consult with an attorney who specializes in copyright law. I also highly recommend consulting with an attorney before signing any publishing contract, regardless of whether it’s with a traditional publisher or a partnership publisher. Licensing agreements can be complicated, and there may be loopholes in there which the author does not expect. You need to fully understand your specific legal rights before going forward.

Gayle Martin

Blogger vs WordPress

© Can Stock Photo / gunnar3000

I’ve been blogging for so long that I can’t remember exactly when I started. It was sometime around 2005, when I published my first Luke and Jenny novelette. I used a blog host called Blogspot, which has since become Blogger. I liked Blogger for many reasons.

The Pros 
  • Blogger is user friendly! You don’t need to know HTML code or have other technical skills to use it.
  • It’s easy to build a template with Blogger. Even the advanced template design tools are user friendly.
  • The Blogger platform is secure. Your blog is less likely to be hacked.
  • Blogger includes an easy to use stats feature. It includes the number of hits, traffic sources, operating systems and so forth.
  • Blogger is free!  It comes with it’s own hosting.
The Cons
  • Blogger has no technical support. Google no longer supports Blogger. If you’re having an issue you have to rely on online forums, which may or may not resolve your issue.
  • There are few plugins for Blogger. Blogger includes “gadgets,” which you can add to your blog. However, the selection somewhat limited, so you may or may not find what you want.
I loved Blogger. I’m a right-brained creative, and Blogger is certainly intuitive. I used it for years. I found it easy to modify the templates, so I could give my blog more of a custom look. However, because there were limits, I could only do so much.
Along came WordPress
While I was using Blogger, some of my author friends were using WordPress. Blogger has a distinctive look. It doesn’t matter how much you modify your template, it still looks like a Blogger blog. WordPress blogs, on the other hand, look more professional.
The Pros
  • WordPress has dozens upon dozens of third party themes and plugins. This gives you infinite possibilities for designing and customizing your blog.
  • You can pick and choose your own host. Unlike Blogger, you can pick your WordPress own platform. Some may offer tech support, while others may not. Prices may also vary. I recommend shopping around.
The Cons
  • WordPress is not user friendly. It’s definitely NOT for people who are unfamiliar with HTML coding or lack other technical skills. Those who are not technically skilled will most likely end up extremely frustrated.
  • WordPress is open code. While open coding allows third parties to create all those wonderful themes and plugins, it also makes WordPress more vulnerable to hacking.
  • Spamming. Spammers love to post their spam in your post’s comments. WordPress has plugins to block spammers. However, they can also make it extremely difficult for legitimate readers to post a comment on your blog.
In Conclusion

If you have the technical skills, or if your budget allows you to hire a webmaster, then I highly recommend WordPress. A customized blog makes you look more professional. I like to keep my websites clean and simple, and I was able to create this blog with the Twenty Sixteen WordPress theme. Please note that some WordPress themes are easy to use while others are not. My WordPress guru helped me find the right plugins for my specific needs, and if I need help she’s only a phone call away.

For those on a budget, I once again recommend shopping around. Nowadays many web host companies include blogs with their packages. This option wasn’t available when I started writing, so it’s worth looking into. WordPress has also changed with the times. It too now offers website hosting, with or without a blog.

Gayle Martin